Contact Kirsty Today on 07885 370346

LATEST NEWS

RDA COACHING CONFERENCE 2015

I was very much privileged to be asked by Sue Adams Wheeler of the RDA to give a Lecture Demonstration for the RDA's Annual Coaching Conference.

My remit was to suggest exercises that could be used for the RDA ponies and horses. With this in mind, I had to consider stimulation while keeping the horses quiet, improvement of welfare and gentle suppling while keeping in mind the diversity of the RDA horse's abilities and ages. Also the RDA individu...al groups are very different, some have much more time on their hands to deliver extracurricular exercises into the routine, while others the volunteers may only have 5 mins at the most with their charges before the riders are mounted.

I demonstrated a few very gentle hands on techniques to relax, stimulate, supple and engage both the horses and the volunteers.

I then moved on to work on the ground over poles, very much based on the philosophy and techniques of TTEAM work, explaining in depth the reasons why these would be so beneficial. I explained that the benefits don't stop with the animals; how these processes are so slow and gentle that not only does it engage the horsey volunteers but also the non horsey volunteers will learn much quicker how a horse learns, reacts and can be bonded with. Ultimately, I also learnt through my experience at the wonderful Riding Establishment at Bryngwyn above Kington which the RDA use twice a week, these exercises can also be shown to the riders as well, broadening their experience with the animal and developing their co-ordination.

I would like to take this chance to express what an amazing charity the RDA is and the opportunity it gives to so many. I was truly blown away by the small amount that I saw.

BIOMACHANICS OF A JUMPING HORSE - 7 HOURS CPD COURSE

Training to include:

  • POWERPOINT PRESENTATION, LIVE HORSES, RELAXED OPEN DISCUSSION
  • IN DEPTH BIOMECHANICS OF THE JUMP, APPROACH, TAKE OFF, FLIGHT, LANDING, RECOVERY
  • LIVE PAINTED HORSE WITH SKELETON AND MUSCLES
  • HORSES LUNGED/RIDDEN OVER FENCES
  • A REVIEW OF THE SKELETON, DETAILED REVISION OF RELEVANT MUSCLES
  • DISCUSSION OF JUMPING RELATED ASPECTS OF THE SKELETON, LIGAMENTS, TENDONS AND MUSCLES
  • SUBJECTIVE CONFORMATIONAL AND POSTURAL OBSERVATION OF DEMO HORSES TO SUGGEST OBJECTIVE PREDISPOSITION TO JUMP
  • SEQUENCE OF LIMB PLACEMENT
  • CONSIDERATIONS; APPROACH TO FENCES, GOING, RIDER EFFECTS, DISEASE

For full details and to download an application form click here

HORSE WORKS AT THE JULY COURSE NEWMARKET 15TH JULY 2015

Gee Major painted at Newmarket July race course

Gee Major painted at Newmarket July race course

Gee Major painted by Horse Works in the Winners Enclosure at Newmarket July Course on 25 June 2015

Horse Works, the collaboration of Nicole Rossa and Kirsty Davis, were invited to The July Course at Newmarket on 15 June 2015. They painted Gee Major from the British Racing School, at the The National Stud before he was walked down to The July Course for the Countryside Alliance Race Day, Anatomy of a Racehorse Demonstration. This was enjoyed by all around the Winners enclosure and the paddock, and much was learnt about the anatomy and physiology of the Racehorse.

BIOMECHANICS OF THE JUMPING HORSE LECTURE FOR THE PONY CLUB YOUNG INSTRUCTORS ADVANCED COURSE 16TH JUNE 2015

Kirsty was kindly asked by William Blane FSHS to give a lecture for the Young Instructors Advanced Course (YIAC), a scholarship course run by The Pony Club. The lecture was on The Biomechanics of the Jumping horse on the 16 June 2015. Kirsty started with some of the basics and went deeper into the biomechanics of fore and hind limb and spine during all phases of the jump.

Murry during the painting session prior to the lecture demonstration at Pony Club

Murry during the painting session prior to the lecture demonstration

Murry painted

Painting finished and Murry ready to be lunged over fences

Murry painted

Painting finished and Murry ready to be lunged over fences


ARCHIVE ARTICLES

Vase Presentation to Kirsty Davis by Claire Galer at The Equine Sports Massage Association AGM & CPD Conference at Donnington Valley April 2013

Presentation to Kirsty Davis at ESMA AGM

It gives me great pleasure and is a great honour to stand here today and present Kirsty Davis with this stunning ESMA engraved glass crystal vase. For Kirsty’s outstanding loyalty, dedication, professionalism and passion to ESMA in her capacity as Chairman for the association for over 10 years.

Kirsty has been the most outstanding Chairman and ESMA would not be where it is today without all the hard work, hours spent and invaluable professional knowledge that Kirsty has been kind enough to devote to and to share with the association. Her hard work, dedication, professionalism and enthusiasm for our governing body has been outstanding.

I know that all our members here today and those that cannot be in attendance would like to extend to Kirsty the warmest of thanks. Many members have been guided and helped through their careers, with much wisdom and advice Kirsty has been able to teach and impart with them.

Kirsty has been the most outstanding Chairman and I have the greatest of respect for her as a fellow professional. Her dedication and professionalism for the association has been to the highest of standards and we all have so much to thank Kirsty for.

So on behalf of all past, present and future ESMA therapists, Kirsty thank you so VERY much.

Ear and Poll Sensitivity

Lastest e-Eventing Website Article

The horse’s (and rider’s!) muscles in detail: take-off

By Kerry, on February 26th, 2013

Article written by Kirsty Davis EQ ITEC Dip, MESMA, ITEC Dip Hu

The Jumping Take off:

The relevant page from Kirsty's book, showing exactly which muscles are in use during take-off

The relevant page from Kirsty’s book, showing exactly which muscles are in use during take-off

In the take off for the jump we see here some very specific muscles doing the bulk of the work for both horse and rider.  Although the rider is largely concerned with balance, his quads and hamstrings are working isometrically (working without shortening or lengthening) and his peroneus is working in the same way to keep the lower leg close to the horses side.

For the horse, his back muscles are extending the back and the massive propulsive energy is about to be released from the gluteal mass which extends the hip joint, the femur opens out to the rear in relation to the pelvis.  This is further enhanced by the hamstring group which have complex actions but largely extend the limb (pull back), for instance when the horse stretches his leg out behind him, but when the hoof is planted on the ground this action then turns into explosive propulsion.  As the horse has not only pushed his front end of the floor but also lifted it of the floor, the propulsion sends him airborne.

This shows the typical biomechanical positioning of the hindquarters to set up elastic recoil (think of a catapult being drawn back) and optimise the effect of the extensor muscles of the hindlimb to create propulsion.  In this position the hamstrings are momentarily also stabilising the horse as he lifts his forehand into the air.  You now start to appreciate the very complex multiple actions and reactions of these tissues.  Ground conditions have a impact on the effect of the muscles.  If the ground is firm propulsion is far easier, as the ground exerts a force against the planted hoof, maximising effect.  In reverse, deep ground diminishes the propulsion of the horse.  Less of the propulsive energy is passed through the horse, some of the energy transfered to the ground is lost through the movement of the ground away from the horse on take off.  Similarly, if the ground is slippery.  There is also the added danger that at the moment this photo is taken if the hindlimbs slip forwards while the hamstrings are compressing, the hamstrings will tear to a greater or lesser extent. This photo shows the typical biomechanical positioning of the hindquarters to set up elastic recoil (think of a catapult being drawn back) and optimise the effect of the extensor muscles of the hindlimb to create propulsion. In this position the hamstrings are momentarily also stabilising the horse as he lifts his forehand into the air. You now start to appreciate the very complex multiple actions and reactions of these tissues.

Ground conditions have a impact on the effect of the muscles. If the ground is firm propulsion is far easier, as the ground exerts a force against the planted hoof, maximising effect. In reverse, deep ground diminishes the propulsion of the horse. Less of the propulsive energy is passed through the horse, some of the energy transfered to the ground is lost through the movement of the ground away from the horse on take off. Similarly, if the ground is slippery. There is also the added danger that at the moment this photo is taken if the hindlimbs slip forwards while the hamstrings are compressing, the hamstrings will tear to a greater or lesser extent.

Unleash the stored energy and propel, we have lift off!!

Unleash the stored energy and propel, we have lift off!!

Another interesting adaptation the horse has developed very well over millenia is the biomechanical  success that is ‘elastic recoil’.  On this diagram you can see the soleus (which works along side the gastrocnemius, equivalent to our calf muscles) attached to the point of hock via the Achilles tendon.  This unit’s fibres extend and are part of the tendinous and ligamentous tissues beneath the hock.  As the horse lowers onto his pasterns he puts himself in a position that stretches these fibres and much like a rubber band ‘elastic energy’ is stored up and like the rubber band, it has the ability to propel.

Kirsty Davis EQ ITEC Dip, MESMA, ITEC Dip Hu

Photos by Katie Mortimore

Original article can be viewed here..

If you would like to know more about Kirsty’s book click here

Peasebrook Equine Open Day 2012

Post Event Press Release – Press Report August 2012

PER Open Day 2012

1st July 2012 was the most fantastic day at Peasebrook Equine; the Clinic & Rehabilitation Centre would like to thank everyone who attended for their support & interest on the day. The Team were lucky with the weather, possibly the only day that July 2012 has seen with no rain & even some sunshine! Despite the road closures throughout the county & the huge turnout of spectators in Broadway for the arrival of the Olympic torch, well over 450 Equine Enthusiasts made their way to Peasebrook for an exceptional day of Equine Education & Entertainment. After 21 years of servicing the equine community; this was the first occasion for Peasebrook, the country’s leading combined Equine Veterinary & Rehabilitation Centre to throw open their doors.

The Team at Peasebrook were delighted to have Honorary guest Mary Bromiley MBE on board with the team for the day; to officially open the PER ECB Equine Spa & be available to discuss questions with clients throughout the day. Mary Bromiley is an eminent author & speaker worldwide & gave the most fascinating & entertaining speech at the opening. Speeches & video of the official opening are available at the practice websites; www.peasebrookequinerehab.co.uk, www.peasebrookequineclinic.com & www.eqwisemassage.co.uk and are well worth viewing.

The event started with a superb ground schooling & lunging display by Anna Buchannan & Dr Hilary Bentley, with “Buster Cunning”. Hilary gave an insightful demonstration of the Equi-Ami, it’s benefits & usage within ground schooling. The feedback from Clients attending the day, found this informative, educational & many purchased the aid for use with their own horses.

Jake Lomberg-Williams & Natalya Watson gave a fascinating display with their polo ponies. The Polo Masterclass & Demonstration with commentary from Jack Tucker, was an exhilarating insight into the world of Polo. The many spectators at the event were fascinated by their performance & thoroughly enjoyed this part of the day.

The highlight of the day being Mary Bromiley’s fascinating speech; her depth of knowledge, ability to impart it, years of experience & wisdom was evident in her words. Mary has great belief in the work that is conducted at Peasebrook & it was a delight to hear her enthusiasm & support to the team. To take an extract from her words:

“Having founded Downs House Equine Therapy & Rehabilitation Centre in Lambourne in 1984, it took 10 years to convince the veterinary profession that selected Physiotherapy methods, given by a person who had adequate training could help the profession & we did! When I built Downs House, I never my wildest dreams did I imagine that I would ever be privileged to come & open a centre such as this. All of you that are here are so lucky, everything is here. Not only are you going to get an in-depth diagnosis, which is what those of us on the fringes of the veterinary profession require. Tim & Claire have organised in their usual brilliant fashion, everything that they feel is needed to get horses back to their full working potential. I wish the centre all the luck in the world & thank you all for coming today”

Claire Galer Equine Sports Therapist, Equine Nutritionist & Peasebrook Equine Rehabilitation Manager said: “Mary has revolutionised the way horses have been treated and rehabilitated from soft tissue and muscle injury. She singlehandedly linked physiotherapy to the veterinary profession; I have the greatest admiration for Mary & would not be the therapist I am without her. We are all privileged & delighted to have Mary here at Peasebrook on board with the Team for today, it has been a great honour”. Mary's speech can be viewed on our video page.

Further displays of “Equine Excellence” kicked off the afternoons performances in the arena. Nickie Maddaford & two of her pupils demonstrated Dressage training, with superb & diligent dressage schooling displays. Nickie has had great success personally with her own horse’s, she trains with Carl Hester & is a fantastic trainer, with many of her pupils achieving great results & much success on the competition circuit. Sue Tupman & Dusty, displayed. Followed by Hannah Drinkwater on The Galer’s “Dark Angel”. Videos of these displays can be viewed on the PER website. Kirsty Davis, the chairman of ESMA, professional therapist, advanced rider & producer of young horses show cased 3 of her young Eventers. Kirsty gave a fascinating display that was insightful & informative. Discussing in great depth what to Look For Anatomically, Biomechanically & Under Saddle when purchasing an event horse. Kirsty is an exceptional lady with immense talent & expertise & brought so much to her displays. The crowd of spectators were evidently overwhelmed & impressed by her depth of knowledge.

Kirsty Davis Equine logo

About Kirsty Davis

Kirsty treating a horse with equine massage

Kirsty Davis equine tuition

Kirsty Davis lecturing

Horses

Kirsty Davis equine book

Testimonials about Kirsty's equine services

Contact Kirsty

Lower Cwmgilla,
Cwmgilla Lane,
Knighton,
POWYS, LD7 1PG

Tel: 01547 520503 - Mob: 07885 370346